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Sticks, Coins & More...

The puzzles are marked with stars (*) that show the degree of difficulty of the given puzzle.
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Copyright © 1996-2014. RJE-productions. All rights reserved. No part of this website may be published, in any form or by any means, without the prior permission of the authors.

Sticking Away Squares *

Puzzle

Here you see five equal squares.

The Question: Can you leave just three squares by taking away three sticks?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: Here you see six equal squares.

Puzzle

Can you leave just three squares by taking away five sticks?

Another Answer: Click here!...

Yet Another Question: Can you leave two complete squares only, by taking away two sticks from the pattern shown below?

Puzzle

Yet Another Answer: Click here!...

The Fourth Question: Can you leave two complete squares only, by taking away eight sticks from the pattern shown below?

Puzzle

The Fourth Answer: Click here!...

The Fifth Question: Can you leave six squares only, by taking away eight sticks from the pattern shown below?

Puzzle

The Fifth Answer: Click here!...

The Sixth Question: Can you leave three squares only, by taking away six sticks from the pattern shown below?

Puzzle

The Sixth Answer: Click here!...


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Triangle Tricks *

Puzzle

Sixteen sticks form eight equal triangles.

The Question: Can you take away four sticks and leave only four of these triangles?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: Thirteen sticks form eight triangles (six small ones and two large ones).

Puzzle

Can you take away three sticks and leave only three triangles?

Another Answer: Click here!...

Yet Another Question: The nine sticks shown below form three equal triangles.

Puzzle

How can two sticks be moved to make four equal triangles?

Yet Another Answer: Click here!...

The Fourth Question: The eighteen sticks shown below form thirteen triangles (nine small ones, three medium ones, and a large one).

Puzzle

Can you leave only seven of these thirteen triangles by taking away just three sticks?

The Fourth Answer: Click here!...

The Fifth Question: These thirteen sticks form six equal triangles.

Puzzle

Can you leave only three of these six triangles by removing four sticks?

The Fifth Answer: Click here!...


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Shuffle the Sticks! *

Puzzle

The Question: Can you rearrange the five sticks (shown on the right) to make two equal triangles?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: Can you make five triangles by rearranging the nine sticks shown below?

Puzzle

Another Answer: Click here!...


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Stick Spiral *

Puzzle

These fifteen sticks form a spiral.

The Question: Can you turn this spiral into two squares by moving exactly three sticks?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Like a Fish in Water **

Puzzle

On the right, you see a fish swimming to the left.

The Question: Can you make the fish swim to the right by moving only three sticks?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Jump & Pile **

Below you see ten coins in a row. The goal is to make five piles of two coins. You must, however, jump over two other coins (these can be two coins next to each other, but also two piled coins!) to place a coin on top of another coin. You may jump only with coins that have not been piled yet.

The Question: How can this be done?

A Hint : By clicking on the small arrows, you can move the coins in the desired direction.

The Answer: Click here!...


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Turn the Triangle **

Puzzle

On the right, you see a triangle formed by ten coins. The triangle points upwards.

The Question: How can just three coins be moved to make the triangle point downwards?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Storm-Damage **

Puzzle

Peasant Janet kept six pigs in six pens of equal size, made with thirteen wooden fences (see the picture on the right). One night, there was a terrible storm, in which one of the thirteen fences was badly damaged. Janet rearranged the remaining fences so that the six pigs still each had pens of equal size.

The Question: How did she do that?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Homework **

Puzzle

The Question: Can you draw this house in one stroke (i.e., without lifting the pen from the paper) and without crossing an already drawn part?

The Answer: Click here!...


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In or Out **

Puzzle

On the right, you see a glass formed by four sticks. In the glass, there is a coin.

The Question: Can you move just two sticks to place the coin out the glass?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Sunny Summer **

The square cards below must be arranged into one large square. Two cards may, however, only be laid against each other if the (half) suns are of the same color.

Unfortunately, your browser does not support HTML5. Therefore, you cannot solve this puzzle online with the mouse. Print the puzzle and cut out the cards.
Puzzle Puzzle Puzzle
Puzzle Puzzle Puzzle
Puzzle Puzzle Puzzle

The Question: How can this be done?

A Hint : You can drag the cards over the field using your mouse. It is also possible to move all cards together by "dragging" the field.

The Answer: Click here!...


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Penny through the Paper **

Puzzle

Take a coin from your wallet (a 1 or 2 Euro piece works best).

Take a piece of paper and cut a circular hole in it middle, which is slightly smaller than the size of the coin (a diameter which is roughly 80% of the diameter of the coin, see picture).

The Question: How can you get the coin through the hole without breaking or cutting the paper?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Six-Sided Stick Shape **

Puzzle

The twelve sticks shown on the right form a six-sided shape containing six triangles.

The Question: Can you make three triangles by moving four sticks?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: Starting with the same six-sided shape, can you make four equal rhombs by moving exactly three sticks?

Another Answer: Click here!...

Yet Another Question: Starting with the same six-sided shape, can you make four equal rhombs by moving exactly four sticks?

Yet Another Answer: Click here!...


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Squared Sticks **

Puzzle

Twelve sticks form four equal squares.

The Question: How can exactly four sticks be moved to make three equal squares?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: Twelve sticks form four equal squares.

Puzzle

How can exactly three sticks be moved to make three equal squares?

Another Answer: Click here!...

Yet Another Question: Sixteen sticks form five squares.

Puzzle

Can you make four squares from this by moving two sticks?

Yet Another Answer: Click here!...

The Fourth Question: Sixteen sticks form five squares.

Puzzle

Can you turn these five squares into four squares by moving three sticks?

The Fourth Answer: Click here!...

The Fifth Question: Twenty sticks form seven equal squares.

Puzzle

How can three sticks be moved to make five equal squares?

The Fifth Answer: Click here!...

The Sixth Question: By moving only two sticks, these three equal sized squares can be changed into four equal sized rectangles.

Puzzle

How can this be done?

The Sixth Answer: Click here!...


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Stick-at-Nothing! **

Puzzle

On the right, you see six sticks.

The Question: Can you rearrange these six sticks to leave nothing?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Stick Stars **

Puzzle

Eighteen sticks form a star with eight triangles (six small ones and two large ones).

The Question: How can just two sticks be moved to make four small triangles and two large ones?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: Starting with the same star, can you form six equal quadrilaterals by moving exactly six sticks?

Another Answer: Click here!...


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Stick Shapes **

Puzzle

There are four squares in the pattern shown on the right.

The Question: How can two sticks be moved to make five equal squares?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: Below you see a hexagon formed by six sticks.

Puzzle

Can you turn this hexagon into two rhombs by moving two sticks and adding one?

Another Answer: Click here!...

Yet Another Question: Can you make four equal triangles from the pattern shown below, by moving exactly four sticks?

Puzzle

Yet Another Answer: Click here!...

The Fourth Question: Twelve sticks form one square and four triangles.

Puzzle

Can you move six sticks to make three squares and one triangle?

The Fourth Answer: Click here!...

The Fifth Question: Can you make two squares from the pattern shown below, by moving four sticks?

Puzzle

The Fifth Answer: Click here!...

The Sixth Question: Can you make three equal squares from the pattern shown below, by moving just three sticks?

Puzzle

The Sixth Answer: Click here!...


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Touching Sticks ***

Puzzle

The Question: How can these six sticks be arranged so that every stick touches every other stick?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Cuddling Coins ***

The pattern of coins shown on the left must be transformed into the pattern shown on the right, by moving exactly three coins, where at the end of each move each coin needs to touch with at least two other coins. The coins must be moved flat on the table (coins cannot move over each other).

Puzzle Puzzle

The Question: How can this be done?

The Answer: Click here!...


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Mathematical Sticks ***

Puzzle

The Question: Can you balance the equation shown on the right, by moving exactly three sticks?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: The equation shown below is not correct.

Puzzle

How can you make this equation correct, without moving a single stick?

Another Answer: Click here!...

Yet Another Question: In the equation shown below, three sticks are missing.

Puzzle

Where should the three missing sticks be placed to make the equation correct?

Yet Another Answer: Click here!...

The Fourth Question: In the equation shown below, four sticks are missing.

Puzzle

Where should the four missing sticks be placed to make the equation correct?

The Fourth Answer: Click here!...


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Solitaire ***

In this game, there are 32 pieces in a playing field with 33 places. You can only jump over a piece, if there is a free place directly behind this piece. You may jump horizontally or vertically. Every piece that has been jumped over, is removed from the field. The goal of this game is to leave exactly one piece, in the middle of the playing field.

The Question: How can this be done?

A Hint : By clicking on the small arrows, you can move the pieces in the desired direction.

The Answer: Click here!...


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Stick Tricks ***

Puzzle

The Question: How can eleven sticks be rearranged to make nine (without taking any away)?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: Can you rearrange these three sticks to make nine?

Puzzle

Another Answer: Click here!...

Yet Another Question: How can nine sticks be rearranged to make ten?

Puzzle

Yet Another Answer: Click here!...

The Fourth Question: Can you rearrange these five sticks to make fourteen?

Puzzle

The Fourth Answer: Click here!...


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Tricky Sticks ***

Puzzle

The Question: Can you rearrange the nine sticks (shown on the right) to make a pattern containing three squares?

The Answer: Click here!...

Another Question: These twelve sticks form five squares (four small ones and a large one). How can two sticks be moved to make seven squares?

Puzzle

Another Answer: Click here!...

Yet Another Question: Can you make four equal triangles, of the same size as the triangles shown below, using just six sticks?

Puzzle

Yet Another Answer: Click here!...

The Fourth Question: Can you rearrange these eight sticks to make two squares and four triangles?

Puzzle

The Fourth Answer: Click here!...

The Fifth Question: In the pattern shown below, you see six equal squares.

Puzzle

Can you make a pattern containing only three squares by moving four sticks?

The Fifth Answer: Click here!...


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Copyright © 1996-2014. RJE-productions. All rights reserved. No part of this website may be published, in any form or by any means, without the prior permission of the authors.
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